the-sprint: removed section about sprint burndown
authorChase Maupin <chase.maupin@ti.com>
Fri, 10 May 2013 15:10:12 +0000 (10:10 -0500)
committerFelipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com>
Wed, 15 May 2013 18:27:16 +0000 (21:27 +0300)
* This section discusses a concept covered in basic training and
  is something important to the sprint teams.  At the same time
  since this manual can be read outside of the LCPD team we do
  not want to promote the sprint burndown chart as an artifact
  that should be focused on by people outside of the team as this
  can lead to distracting the teams with questions about the
  burndown.  This chart is meant for the team's use only.
* This was isolated into a separate commit in case it is decided
  to resurrect this section in the future.

Signed-off-by: Chase Maupin <Chase.Maupin@ti.com>
Signed-off-by: Felipe Balbi <balbi@ti.com>
the-sprint.tex

index edabbf985147d32646e108a66c26e7ab037826c7..86efb27ffc2cb2791f02bf6be2eeba442407f5e6 100644 (file)
@@ -19,8 +19,7 @@ In section \ref{sec:sprint-duration} we shall discuss about Sprint Duration and
 what is Linux Core Product Development's accepted duration. In the following
 section \ref{sec:sprint-process} we shall expose Scrum's development process and
 discuss how to handle an iterative development model while developing Linux
-Kernel code. Lastly, on section \ref{sec:sprint-burndown-charts} we will expose
-the idea of Sprint Burndown Charts; what they are and how to use them.
+Kernel code.
 
 \paragraph{}
 By the end of this chapter, we should have enough grounds to discuss about how
@@ -112,50 +111,3 @@ The test case and code/scripts and documentation used to run that test case
 are artifacts of the sprint and should be delivered to the system test team
 for integration into the automated test system.  This is refere to in chapter
 \ref{chap:definition-of-done} as part of the definition of done.
-
-\section{Sprint Burndown Charts}
-\label{sec:sprint-burndown-charts}
-
-\paragraph{}
-The burndown chart is a simple way to visualize how current sprint is
-developing. It shows, at any given time, how many hours and days are left for
-this sprint.
-
-\paragraph{}
-By looking at older sprints, we can also extrapolate the data to generate
-valuable statistics about the team. The \textit{Team Velocity} is one of such
-statistics and it tells us how many Story Points (or engineering hours) are
-completed per-sprint. That information allows ScrumMasters to estimate when the
-entire project will be complete.
-
-\paragraph{}
-Figure \ref{fig:example-burndown-chart} below shows an example Sprint Burndown
-Chart.
-
-\begin{figure}[ht]
-       \centering
-       \pgfplotsset{width=12cm}
-       \pgfplotsset{grid style={dashed,lightgray}}
-       \begin{tikzpicture}
-               \begin{axis}[xlabel=Days,ylabel=Effort (hours),grid=both]
-                       \addplot coordinates {
-                               (1, 60)
-                               (2, 51)
-                               (3, 47)
-                               (4, 40)
-                               (5, 35)
-                               (6, 22)
-                               (7, 13)
-                               (8, 8)
-                               (9, 3)
-                               (10, 0)
-                       };
-               \end{axis}
-       \end{tikzpicture}
-       \caption{Example Sprint Burndown Chart}
-       \label{fig:example-burndown-chart}
-\end{figure}
-
-\paragraph{}
-It's easy to see how we can extrapolate team velocity after we have more than
-one Sprint Burndown Chart available.